The Antiquary

The Antiquary

by Walter Scott

A mysterious young man calling himself 'Lovel' travels idly but fatefully toward the Scottish seaside town of Fairport. Here he is befriended by the antiquary Jonathan Oldbuck, who has taken refuge from his own personal disappointments in the obsessive study of miscellaneous history. Their slow unraveling of Lovel's true identity will unearth and redeem the secrets and lies which have devastated the guilt-haunted Earl of Glenallan, and will reinstate the tottering fortunes of Sir Arthur Wardour and his daughter Isabella.

  • Series: Waverley Novels
  • Language: English
  • Category: Classics
  • Rating: 3.84
  • Pages: 528
  • Publish Date: May 23rd 2002 by Oxford University Press
  • Isbn10: 0192831879
  • Isbn13: 9780192831873

What People Think about "The Antiquary"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b064xbpk Description: Richard Wilson stars as The Antiquary, a man who hordes secrets as well as treasures. This is Scott's gothic novel, redolent with family secrets, stories of hidden treasure and hopeless love, with a mysterious, handsome, young man, benighted aristocracy and a night-time funeral procession to a ruined abbey.

I guess the narrator is Scott himself.

From BBC Radio 4 - Drama: Richard Wilson stars as The Antiquary, a man who hordes secrets as well as treasures. This is Scott's gothic novel, redolent with family secrets, stories of hidden treasure and hopeless love, with a mysterious, handsome, young man, benighted aristocracy and a night-time funeral procession to a ruined abbey.

I've read a few other Waverly novels, so I'm looking forward to this one.

I wish there were more depth to Lovel's character; we don't get to see him nearly enough.

The Scottish slang is almost impossible to follow for modern English readers; Scott hewed precisely to the way rural people talked in the 18th century. The book both respects and rejects the pedantry of the bombastic title character and soars into nothing less than a sharp-eyed, delightful look into a long-ago past.

I'm on a mission to read all of Scott - I'm more optimistic about the task after this.

Antiquary was a good book and a good story. I persevered, I figured out what Scott was saying and than somewhere half way through the book, I also figured out what the ending was going to be. Setting: 3 Given the Scotts own point that Waverly novels are meant to show the spirit of his times, I cant help but think of Balzac who did the same with his Human Comedy. One huge difference is that I read Balzac translated to English from old French so I can immerse better in the story. Setting as great, Scott does a great job creative a good and immersive images of the old times, it is just very difficult to comprehend. I wonder how many years before the books will become unreadable and maybe someone qualified should consider updating the language while somehow preserving the feel of the times so that young people can also enjoy this work.

Reading in part like an expanded stage play with character entries and exits overt, held in check by the self-conscious narrative style, this is a precursor to the great 19th century novels of England.

Scott created and popularized historical novels in a series called the Waverley Novels. In his novels Scott arranged the plots and characters so the reader enters into the lives of both great and ordinary people caught up in violent, dramatic changes in history. Central themes of many of Scott's novels are about conflicts between opposing cultures.