Redgauntlet

Redgauntlet

by Walter Scott

Set in the mid-eighteenth century in the fictitious third Jacobite rebellion, Redgauntlet (1824) tells of Darsie Latimer, a student of law who becomes embroiled in a plot to put Prince Charles Edward (aka, Bonnie Prince Charlie) on the British throne. The events in Redgauntlet never actually took place, but they are probable, and form the culmination of Scott's series of Jacobite novels.

  • Series: Waverley Novels
  • Language: English
  • Category: Classics
  • Rating: 3.55
  • Pages: 544
  • Publish Date: May 1st 2001 by Penguin Classics
  • Isbn10: 0140436553
  • Isbn13: 9780140436556

What People Think about "Redgauntlet"

From BBC Radio 4 - Classical Seral: A free adaptation by Robin Brooks of Scott's novel - now set in the year 2035, in a fictional future Scotland. Alan Fairford is destined to become a lawyer but is distracted from his studies by the sudden disappearance of his best friend Danny Latimer.

Mike Harris adapts Sir Walter Scott's The Bride of Lammermoor: The novel is set in the Lammermuir Hills of south-east Scotland at the beginning of the 18th Century and tells of a tragic love affair between young Lucy Ashton and her family's enemy Edgar Ravenswood. Jacobite - a supporter of the deposed James II and his descendants Description: Alan Fairford is destined to become a lawyer but is distracted from his studies by the sudden disappearance of his best friend Danny Latimer. Danny's absence seems to be connected with the sudden appearance of Stuart Galloway - aka Redgauntlet - who has business with Alan's father, Alexander.

Grammar Stage Inquiry: The What What is the most important event in the book, in which the character(s) change? Darsie does that because he isnt very smart (none of Sir Walter Scotts heroes are smart). Logic Stage Inquiry The Why and How Is this novel fable or chronicle? The first part of the novel is a series of letters written between the protagonist, Darsie Latimer, and his friend Alan Fairford. Fairford grants that Latimer may have had adventures, but he thinks he embellished the whole thing, and comes close to insulting the man. Sir Walter Scotts skill as a narrator is on full display. Yet in the letter writing he uses the possible Redgauntlet character to tie both Darsies and Fairfords adventures together. I sympathize with both Fairford and Darsie, for I have been both men. Scotts characters in this story arent as affected by the Jacobite cause as others. We all know those who want to overthrow the gubmnt, but what stops them isnt fear or arms, but apathy in their comrades.

This isn't too bad when you're writing about poetry or a very good novella (e.g. Death in Venice, which I've read at least five times in the last two months), but 600 pages of verbose prose peppered with Scottish brogue and legal latinicisms is a different matter. There's a lot of food for thought about Scottish oral literature and history in it (which has made me want to seek out a few books on them) although there isn't much of a plot.

BBC Classic Serial starts July 13 (view spoiler) A free adaptation by Robin Brooks of Scott's novel - now set in the year 2035, in a fictional future Scotland.

Being the last of Scott's Jacobite novels, one might think that he might have started to go stale.

I like reading historical fiction about English history and this was a good story.

The layout of thirteen epistolary chapters followed by twenty three normal chapters is off-putting to say the least.

When the story of a fictional Jacobite uprising toward the end of 18th century finally got under way the book improved considerably.

Scott created and popularized historical novels in a series called the Waverley Novels. In his novels Scott arranged the plots and characters so the reader enters into the lives of both great and ordinary people caught up in violent, dramatic changes in history. Central themes of many of Scott's novels are about conflicts between opposing cultures.